Table of contents

4.3.4. Guidance for climate change risk assessments and resilience planning

Several European countries have developed guidelines for CCIV assessments and/or resilience planning. These guidelines address sectoral departments and agencies, sub-national governments and/or non-state actors (EEA, 2018d). Such guidance documents can support the development or adaptation policies and actions by guiding readers through the key steps and most relevant issues in a structured manner and by pointing to relevant tools and resources. Further guidelines have been developed by the European Union (see Section 4.1.4) and by international organisations (see Section 4.4).

comments (0)

Most guidance documents provided by national authorities are generic and intended to be applicable across a wide range of sectors. As an exception, a guidance document from the United Kingdom has developed a framework for climate risk assessments of national infrastructure from a systems-perspective (Dawson et al., 2018). The framework proposes to view infrastructure beyond physical assets, incorporating resources which are conveyed by infrastructure (vehicles, data, water etc.), processes that influence the infrastructure system (regulations, management, protocols etc.), networks that join locations which demand resources/services (provided by individual physical assets to supply such resources/ services) and services that benefit a range of users (heat, mobility, sanitation etc.). Climate change can directly impact each of the components outlined above, therefore, adaptation measures may be implemented at any of these components. Prior to implementing measures on these components, a systems risk assessment of infrastructure must take place, which requires various steps. These are: a) analyse climate variables; b) characterise each infrastructure asset and understand its response to extreme events and changes in climate; c) analyse network-wide effects of impacts on components; d) analyse interactions and interdependencies between infrastructure networks, in addition to cascading impacts; e) assessment of systemic risks that could occur due to infrastructure loss, including broader indirect impacts; and f) implement adaptation measures.

comments (0)

Outside Europe, the US Department of Energy has produced comprehensive guidelines for resilience planning in the electricity sector, which provide assistance to electric utilities and other stakeholders in assessing vulnerabilities to climate change and extreme weather and in identifying an appropriate portfolio of resilience solutions. Among others, these guidelines present a classification of potential adaption measures to carry out in various parts of the energy system, and they outline a step-by-step approach for calculating the costs of adaptation measures along the energy value chain (US DoE, 2016). The publication of these guidelines was complemented by networking and capacity-building efforts, such as the establishment of the Partnership for Energy Sector Climate Resilience[1] and the State and Regional Energy Risk Assessment Initiative[2].

comments (2)

comments (0)